T. Lux Feininger

Methods

Documentation of the method and organisation of the Catalogue Raisonné.

This online-catalogue presents the first complete publication of the Catalogue Raisonné of the oeuvre by Theodore Lukas “Lux” Feininger and it documents the current stage of work.

Catalogue Raisonné numbers have not yet been allocated in this version.
The catalogue information is bilingual in German and English (American).

Owners and collectors of works by the artist are kindly requested to review, confirm and correct the published data. And to register works by T. Lux Feininger for the catalogue raisonné.

Modus Operandi, Using the Website

This Catalogue Raisonné is published online at www.Art-Archives.net; it documents all works created by T. Lux Feininger: Paintings, Drawings (original works on paper), Photography, Graphics, Sculpture and Studies.

The catalogue contains several chapters. It opens with the biography of the artist: VITA, followed by the chapters WORKS, EXHIBITIONS, LITERATURE, COLLECTIONS, TEXTS, METHODS.
Find a “Search…”-field on the pages’ upper left of any chapter, and search by entering an alphanumerical string. The home button [logo] takes you back to the home page.

The chapter ARTWORKS lists all works created by T. Lux Feininger in variuou media: Painting, Drawing, Photography, Graphics, Sculpture and Studies.
The chapter ARTWORKS can be navigated and sorted in a variety of ways.

In the default basic setting “Highlights only”, a small selection of works by the artist is displayed.
Click “All Works” and get access to the full inventory.
Under ARTWORKS, you also access your own Bookmarks.

The sequence can be displayed by TITLE, DATING or MEDIA.
The display options are LIST or GRID, with three image sizes.
Choose “Works per page: 25 – 50 – 100”.
In the “Search…”-field in the upper left corner, next to the website logo, you can search for a year or a title by entering an alphanumerical string.

If MEDIA is selected, the works are shown in their media-group. Under each media the works are sorted in title-alphabetical order, beginning with numbers.
If DATING is selected, all works of all media are shown in chronological order, sorted according to their date of origin. Under each year the works are shown in title-alphabetical order, beginning with numbers.

The listing can be filtered by MEDIA and THEMES (see left side of the page). MEDIA offers the choice of “All Media” or just one (Paintings or Works on Paper or Studies etc.). Numerous THEMES are assigned to each artwork, and a selection of works connected to a specific theme can be screened. For more granular research, a combination of several themes is possible!.

In the overview of artworks some of the works carry a yellow button with an “i”, indicating further information, quotes or “related artworks” in the context of each of these works.

Each artwork is linked to EXHIBITIONS where it was exhibited, to LITERATURE where it is mentioned, and to public COLLECTIONS that possess it. These links are displayed at the bottom of the page of the respective work.

In the chapter EXHIBITIONS, the entries are linked to respective “Works” and “Literature”, and can be invoked with a click on the number.
In the chapter LITERATURE, the entries are linked to respective “Works” and “Exhibitions”, and can be invoked with a click on the number.
In the chapter COLLECTIONS, the entries are linked to respective “Works”, and can be invoked with a click on the number.
On these pages the records can be sorted in either ascending or descending order by clicking on the column header.


The artworks are chronologically listed by their date of origin. When a definite dating is not possible, the estimated year of origin is preceded by “around”.
In such cases the search query shows the work in and ‘around’ the year given.
Works that have not (yet) been allocated are listed “n.y.”, no year.

Generally, the dating of an artwork which the artist has worked on over the course of more than one year is listed under the year of its completion. If however, photos or other documents show that the reworking has not significantly changed the style or character of the painting, it is sorted in the earlier year noted by the artist.

The works destroyed by the artist himself, known at this stage, have been included in the catalogue raisonné and have been sorted in the yearly timeline (see below).
The folder “ARTWORKS: Destroyed” shows the selection of just these.

There is no chronological order within any given year.

Catalogue Raisonné numbers have not yet been allocated.

All known titles additional to the work title are published (see below).

The Catalogue Raisonné is bilingual, German and US-English.
Work titles have been translated (see below).


PHOTOGRAPHY

Further explanations with regard to the Oeuvre of Photography by T. Lux Feininger are provided in a separate chapter under METHODS. The technical peculiarities and the accessibiliy of sources demand for a more complex specification of the modus operandi for editing and cataloguing this photographic artwork. See METHODS, Photography.


The planning of the Catalogue Raisonné for the Oeuvre by T. Lux Feininger was begun in 2011, the editorial process and the installation of the datebase driven website were started in 2014. Copyright by the editors, Siegfried B. Schäfer and Cecilia A. M. Witteveen, for www.Art-Archives.net/ Kunst-Archive.net, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Sources

In 2014, the editorial process on the Catalogue Raisonné was started. The Catalogue Raisonné for the oeuvre by T. Lux Feininger was initially based on four lists entitled by the artist himself,
– for the paintings: „Catalog of Paintings“ [CoP] and the „List of Sold Works“[L],
– for his early photography: "Inventory of BAUHAUS-related photographs/ Inventar der Photographien aus der BAUHAUSzeit" [IBP], 1980, List of Photographs [LoP], 1983, [211] [214] among others, and
– for sculptures and objects: "Three-Dim. Section/ Three-dimensional Works" [TD] [212].
Comprehensive sources are provided by a collection of photographs of the artist's work, all inscribed by the artist.
And the large photo-documentation by Conrad R. Feininger of all the paintings, drawings and sculptures left in the estate by 2012. All records were kindly made accessible by The Estate of T. Lux Feininger.

The documentation of the early photographs of T.Lux Feininger was kindly supported by the museum Bauhaus Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin, its collections catalogue and images free for publication.
Further explanations with regard to the Oeuvre of Photography by T. Lux Feininger are provided in a separate chapter, see: METHODS, Photography.

The Catalogue Raisonné of paintings by Dr. Ulrich Luckhardt was also taken into consideration, it covers the period up to 1936, the departure for America; it is founded on the Catalog of Paintings and was published in the catalogue for the jubilee exhibition “Welten-Segler [World-Sailer], T. Lux Feininger zum 100. Geburtstag, Werke 1929-1942”, Cologne 2010.
The biography that was compiled for the above publication is the basis for the biography ("Vita") of the artist in this online-Catalogue Raisonné; various additions were made. We thank Dr. Ulrich Luckhardt for his kind permission.

Additional sources include private and public collections, archives of auction houses (mainly in Germany and the USA), as well as exhibition lists and catalogues, books and newspaper articles (see: LITERATURE), and also in the stock book (Lagerbuch) of the Nierendorf Gallery, Berlin.

The estate of the artist and numerous collectors – museums, public and private collections, auction houses and galleries – have given access to their collections and/or have kindly provided photographs and documentation of the works in their possession.

There was limited access to a number of original works for examination, measuring and photographing.

Chronological Grading of Destroyed Works by the Artist

The works destroyed by the artist himself as well as those he overpainted - known at this stage - have been included in the Catalogue Raisonné and have been sorted in the yearly timeline.

The grading and placing was possible since these works were listed and titled in the Catalog of Paintings [CoP] and the artist left thorough photo documentation of those works that he himself destroyed, resp. completely overpainted.

The equal grading with the existing works was encouraged by the handwritten notes often found on the backside of the photos “foolishly destroyed”.
And it is also backed by statements the artist made, in private conversations and also in his autobiography: “…the bottom of misery is reached in waking up to the hideous fact that one has, with one’s own hands and of one’s supposedly free will, destroyed a work worth having and cherishing. Only temporary madness can account for such acts. I have, in my life, painted over, or otherwise “discontinued”, many dozens of my unsuccessful canvasses; some four or five of those victims I regret having destroyed, and the foremost of them is the last picture I did in Bennett Street before moving out – a self portrait. (T. Lux Feininger, „My Life and Painting“, English manuscript).

And finally, after assessing the photo documentation it can be stated that the works destroyed by the artist, a rather large amount, are of a consistently high level.

Conclusion: The carefully kept documentation by the artist about the works destroyed, his explicit doubt regarding his decisions and the verifiable high level of the quality of the works are three solid arguments to include and grade the works destroyed by the artist in the chronological rating of the work.

Also given the rather large number of works destroyed, the inclusion of these works in the listing closes some gaps and shows the progression and growth in the painting oeuvre.

Title, Signature and Inscriptions

PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS

Initially, the work-titles are given by the artist’s inscriptions as marked on the front or the reverse of the work. When no title is given on the painting, the title is chosen from an entry in the artist’s records, the Catalog of Paintings, CoP [201] [202]. For his drawings the artist did not provide catalogues nor lists.

Other titles under which a work was published are also given, whether they originate from exhibition catalogues, reviews or other publicised documents. Untitled drawings have been given descriptive titles by the estate or the editors.
All other titles are mentioned in round brackets after the original title. The sources of the other titles are not mentioned.

All artist descriptions on the works – signature, date, title etc. – are cited verbatim. The placement of these descriptions is noted accordingly; the layout of the various words and numerals, as well as the style are disregarded.

All inscriptions are by the artist, except as otherwise noted.


PHOTOGRAPHY

Generally titles of the photographs are given by the editors, while referring to the situation, moment or session of the picture, naming the persons who could be identified, and considering notes by the artist as well as terms published.
Preference is given to the titles written by the artist in his lists prepared for the exhibitions in 1980 and 1983, some in English and German, some in English only [211] [214]. And as marked on the verso of the print.

All artist descriptions on the works – signature, date, title etc. – are cited verbatim. The placement of these descriptions is noted accordingly; the layout of the various words and numerals, as well as the style are disregarded.

All descriptions are by the artist, unless otherwise noted.

Further explanations with regard to the Oeuvre of Photography by T. Lux Feininger are provided in a separate chapter, see: METHODS, Photography.


SCULPTURES

The original titles are as marked on the work. When no title is given on the work, the title follows the entry of the artist's list: Three-Dim. Section/ Three-dimensional Works [212].

Usually the artist did not name his sculptures ("toys").
However, the sons of the artist remember the works from their childhood and named them accordingly. These titles are mentioned in the Catalogue Raisonné.

Additional titles are mentioned in round brackets; the sources of additional titles are not mentioned.

All artist descriptions on the works – signature, date, title etc. – are cited verbatim. The placement of these descriptions is noted accordingly; the layout of the various words and numerals, as well as the style are disregarded.

All descriptions are by the artist, unless otherwise noted.

Title translation and Bilingualism

The Catalogue Raisonné is bilingual, German and English-American.
Titles of works of the early years of the artist's creativity have been translated as well, except for the works destroyed by the artist.

The Catalogue Raisonné follows the practice of the catalogues of German exhibitions, the titles were translated in these publications.

The decision to translate the titles is mainly owed to the method of working by the artist, who freely switched between both languages.
Founded in his biography, born and raised in Berlin, son of a German and an American, and migrating to America at the age of 26, he titles his early work mostly in German, later in English; and at a later stage renaming some of the German titles in English.
This explains some of the various titles for one and the same painting. Other explanations for the various titles are different names in exhibition and sales catalogues or reviews.

The various titles used by the artist or in publications are noted in round brackets (…) following the original title.

T. Lux Feininger also titled some of his works in French or used encoded word and letter games. In both cases these titles have been translated resp. communicated.

All translations are discernible. Descriptions that are not marked (also those in round brackets) are by the artist resp. used by the source in the respective language, therefore they are not translated.

The translated titles, quotations or texts are marked with an asterisk*. All titles, except for those of the works destroyed by the artist, and comments have, wherever possible, been translated.

Explanatory translations or intelligibility translations are marked in square brackets. This applies for instance to the French titles and the word and letter games that have been analogously translated in English resp. German.

Since some of the titles by T. Lux Feininger were given in German, English or French or multilingual, not all entries are marked with an asterisk.

Quotations from the autobiography by T. Lux Feininger “Zwei Welten” [205] were taken from there and are not translated. The corresponding quotations in English are taken from the original manuscript and are also not translated.

Entries in square brackets […] always mark notations by the editors.

Statements and Explanations about the Work

Statements and explanations by the artist or others about a respective work may be given as background information; these include comments on the subject matter, events, the process of creation, memories etc. (Quotations from the autobiography by T. Lux Feininger “Zwei Welten” [205] were taken from there and are not marked as being translated (*). The corresponding quotations in English are taken from the original manuscript and are also not translated.)

If relevant to the work, references are given to significant documents, remarks about possible problems re. dating or attribution, background information about subjects and people presented and possible technical details.

The sources of quotes are listed, and generally given in square brackets [200]; see: METHODS, Annotations and References.

Further explanations with regard to the Oeuvre of Photography by T. Lux Feininger are provided in a separate folder, see: METHODS, Photography.

Technique, Material and Measurement

PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS:

The information regarding technique is followed by information about the carrier material.
The measurements of paintings and drawings are given in inches and centimeters, height by width. Measurements are taken from the outer corners of the stretcher frame or those of the sheet.


GRAPHICS:

The information regarding technique is followed by information about the carrier material.
The size of graphic prints is given in inches and centimeters, height by width. The measurements refer to the plate or block image, not to the paper size.

After 1945, the artist solely worked on linocuts. According to Conrad Feininger, in the familiy the prints were talked about as being "woodcuts". Therefore, in some literature his handprints are erroneously called woodcuts/woodcut prints.
All works were handprinted by the artist in small numbers.


PHOTOGRAPHY:

Measurements of a negatives, dia-positives as well as prints are given in millimeters, height by width. The size of the negative and diapositive refer to the glass or the film size respectively; the size of the prints refers to the photographic paper-sheet (not the image).

Further explanations with regard to the Oeuvre of Photography by T. Lux Feininger are provided in a separate chapter, see: METHODS, Photography.


SCULPTURES:

The information about the material is followed by the technical information.
The sizes of the sculptures are given in inches and centimeters, height by width by depth. The measurements refer to the maximum span in each direction.

All accessible works were examined, measured, and photographed. In some cases, when this was not possible, the measurements were taken from the sources or as given by the owners – or marked „size not known“.

Dating and Place

The specification about the date of origin of an artwork is determined by the year. It corresponds with the inscription given by the artist on the work of art, or with records.
Only if the artist specified the dating by day or month, this information is added.

When two years are noted on the work and it can be assumed that the artist had worked over this period, the work is dated at the the later year.
If two (or more) years are noted on the work it can be assumed that the artist had worked over the course of more than one year. In these cases, the work is dated with the later year.
However when photos or other documentation by the artist show that the painting was not essentially changed in style or character, the work is sorted in the earlier year noted by the artist.

If the artist did not date the work it was listed by stylistic criteria and marked with the term "ca."

If an artwork is listed with a different date in other sources, or an assumed date is questionable, the listing is marked as “doubtful”.


The date of origin of a photograph is the moment the trigger was pushed, the exposure of the negative. The dating of the prints remains unconsidered.
Undated photographs are sorted stylistically and marked with the term "around". Dates may deviate in literature or catalogues, notably if the year is given by the autor or owner of the print.
Further explanations with regard to the Oeuvre of Photography by T. Lux Feininger are provided in a separate chapter, see: METHODS, Photography.


The Place of origin of a work was derived from the biography of the artist, sometimes based on notes by the artist. Places of origin of most of the paintings are taken from the list kept by the artist, the Catalog of Paintings [201].

Whereabouts and Provenance

Provenances are not mentioned in the online version of the Catalogue Raisonné.

The Catalogue Raisonné gives the name of the holder, if the artwork is in a public collection; the chapter COLLECTIONS shows all public collections under their current official name. All works of the artist that are part of the collection are linked to this entry.


PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS

On the page of each respective work the name of the public collection as its possessor is mentioned below the specifications of the work.

Private collectors are not mentioned.**
When the current holder could not be identified or has not confirmed his ownership, the whereabouts of the artwork are considered as being not known, and is not mentioned.

On the page of the details of each painting or drawing the name of the public collection as its possessor is mentioned below the data of the artwork, and above the reference to the assigned "Themes: ...".

Private collectors are not mentioned.**
When the current possessor could not be identified or has not reconfirmed his ownership, the whereabouts of the artwork are considered as being not known, and is not mentioned.


PHOTOGRAPHY

The full motive of the original image, as given with the negative, defines the artwork in Photography. Prints made from this source are listed and described on the page of the artwork under "Prints known:". The naming of the possessor is followed by description of each print.
The name of the public collection as its possessor is mentioned, the work is linked to the collection's holdings.
Private owners are anonymised and mentioned as "Private collection".**
When the current possessor could not be identified or has not reconfirmed his ownership (e.g. after a sale at auction), whereabouts is marked as "NN".

Further explanations with regard to the Oeuvre of Photography by T. Lux Feininger are provided in a separate chapter, see: METHODS, Photography.


GRAPHICS

The full motive of the original image, as given with the printing plate or block, defines the artwork in the medium of Graphics. Prints made from this source are listed and described on the page of the artwork under "Prints known:". The naming of the possessor is followed by description of each print.
The name of the public collection as its possessor is mentioned, the work is linked to the collection's holdings.
Private owners and unknown whereabouts are not mentioned.**


**Requests for addresses of holders of works – if known – will be forwarded by the editors to the respective holder.

Photography

MODUS OPERANDI PHOTOGRAPHY


The technical specifics of the analog photography in general and the artist’s handling of photographic techniques in particular require a different process for the compilation of the Catalogue Raisonné of T. Lux Feininger's photographic Oeuvre.


The form of analog photography comprises two different creative processes that are to be united in the Catalogue Raisonné: Image setting (framing) and image editing.

The setting of the image via the camera’s viewfinder followed by the exposure of the negative in the camera by pressing the shutter release of the camera – the first creative process. The negative shows the full image motif framed in the camera's viewfinder – as it was set by the arist.
The negative is always the template for the varied image processing that follows in the darkroom; in the dark photo lab, the image editing takes place – the second creative process. By exposing and developing the photographic paper all individual prints and duplicates are made.
No matter what results the processing process produces, the image motif frozen in the negative is always the template for the exposed photographic paper: the photograph.

Taking these considerations into account, the Catalogue Raisonné of the photographic Oeuvre defines only the unique original image motif – as frozen in the negative - as a “Work”. And all prints based on this template are subsumed under this work entry. (This distinguishes the catalogue raisonné from the collection catalogue, in which the photographic prints—usually by different artists—are listed as unique works of the inventory.)



T. Lux Feininger's photographic Oeuvre consists exclusively of analog black-and-white photographs in the form of negatives and paper prints (exception: one single known autochrome glass diapositive).

In the Catalogue Raisonné the motif framed by the artist in the camera's viewfinder is defined as Work. This image motif is documented by the negative.
Different prints may have been made from this negative at different times, by the artist and/or other persons, with different framing, in different techniques, on different image carriers and sizes.

Photographs by the artist for which original negatives can no longer be found are also listed as works in the Catalogue Raisonné (Negative untraceable), provided that either (a) a repro negative produced by the artist is available, or (b) that one or more prints are known, or (c) that the existence of such prints is documented. If no negative is known, it remains uncertain whether the image of the print corresponds to the complete, uncropped picture motif of the negative.

Accordingly, in the Catalogue Raisonné, the original motif alone constitutes the entry as a Work.
Information on theNegative is given under the entry of each respective work. In addition, all of the prints, which are known to the editors, are listed, described, and illustrated underPrints known or Copy prints known.
Prints from the original negative are numbered with Arabic numerals, reproductions with Roman numerals. This numbering is repeated under the respective illustrations.

Occasionally subject-related explanations by the editor, quotes and/or explanations by the artist or other authors are added to the work entry.
Related artworks from the artist's Oeuvre are listed, as well asExhibitionsin which the work was shown, andLiteraturein which it was published.

These informations are linked to the work, and could be accessed with a mouse click.


ILLUSTRATIONS

If available, illustrations are added with the negative of each work. Known prints are presented recto and verso. For better visibility, the main view is usually a processed monochrome image with the caption, Repro: MAIN.

If a work is known mainly by a cropped section of the full image motif of the negative, in the main view of the work both, the photo showing the detail, and the full image of the negative, are illustrated [see: “La Voile”, “Still Life with Mask by T. Lux Feininger ...”]. The same applies to prints which were made in right-reading direction as well as reversed [cf. “Staircase Wit (l’esprit d’escalier) III”].

The numbering of the illustrations corresponds with the entries under Prints known: or Copy prints known: respectively. Images of negatives do not carry an item number and are labeledRepro: Negative.

The rights holder of the illustrated image file is named after the item number under the illustration (e.g. "Repro: 1. Metropolitan Museum of Art“). The key to the abbreviation can be found atMethods, Illustrations and Photo credits.

Copyright for all works: The Estate of T. Lux Feininger, USA.


DOCUMENTATION, TECHNIQUE, DIMENSIONS

In each work entry, where known, descriptions of the Negative are given, listing material, dimensions (height before width in millimeters), and whereabouts. The same applies to repro negatives and diapositives.

Prints of a work on photographic paper are described in detail, listing whereabouts, technique, paper size (height before width in millimeters), inscriptions etc. Prints from the original negative or diapositive are documented as well as reproductions (copy prints). Prints from the original negative are numbered with Arabic numerals, reproductions with Roman numerals.

Prints made from the original negative can be “early prints” (so-called Vintages, made close to the date of the exposure by the artist), or “later prints” made by the artist or by a third party. Also included in the Catalogue Raisonné are “late prints” from the original negative, made by the artist himself or by a third party, during the artist's lifetime or posthumously. And because in some cases only copy prints (reproductions of photographs by the artist) are known, these are also mentioned in the Catalogue Raisonné to ensure completeness.


SOURCES, PROVENANCE

All negatives and prints known of a work at the time of the creation of the Catalogue Raisonné are assigned to the work entry.

The source reference for the negative follows the technical information. If owned by a public collection, the name of the institution is included in the listing. If there is no mention of a public collection, the negative is with a private collection.

For prints, the source reference is followed by the technical information. If owned by a public collection, the name of the institution is included in the listing. Private owners are anonymized asPrivate collection.

If a work is listed for which neither a negative nor a print is known, the source is named. The existence of the work can, for example, be traced back to the illustration in a publication. Or it is mentioned in a listing of works or other records by the artist. In the latter case, the work is listed without an illustration.


SOURCES FOR THE PHOTOGRAPHIC OEUVRE


Negatives

T. Lux Feininger used different camera models with different negative formats.

– The negatives of T. Lux Feininger's early photographs (1925-1936), which were first glass negatives and later film negatives, are largely untraceable. Only few are in private or museum collections.

– The film negatives of the photographs, which were mainly taken in New York after the artist’s arrival in the United States and until he joined the United States Army (1936-1942), were largely family-owned and could be documented.

– The latter also applies to the negatives of T. Lux Feininger’s artistic and experimental photography (1945-1958), which he resumed in New York after the Second World War.

In the early 1980s, the artist produced numerous copy negatives (repro negatives) from early prints in his possession, which were intended for sale. Nearly all of these copy negatives, all numbered by the artist, could be documentated with the respective work entry in the Catalogue Raisonné.


Prints on paper

Throughout his artistic life, T. Lux Feininger had access to darkrooms, in which he exposed his prints himself. In Weimar and Dessau, these were initially his father's darkrooms, and the Bauhaus photo lab in Dessau. Darkened bathrooms were later converted into makeshift photo labs.
The artist only made single prints or small runs for his teachers, fellow students, for family members and friends, or for the photo agency “Dephot”.

At no time did T. Lux Feininger print or have printed higher editions or series from a negative.

Only a few prints are known to have been made by photo studios at the artist's request, most dating after 1945.

– Prints on photographic paper from the period of study at the Bauhaus in Dessau were neither cataloged nor exhibited as a group of works at the time they were made. Today only individual prints are in private or museum collections—either as vintage prints, later prints, or reproductions.

– In 1980, T. Lux Feininger documented his early photographic Oeuvre of the 1920s and 1930s for the first time. He selected a collection of 202 original prints for his first show of photographs at the Prakapas-Gallery, New York, 1980 [see annotation 211: Inventory of BAUHAUS-related photographs].
This list of 202 prints that were physically available in 1980 and which the artist measured and described, is the source for the Catalogue Raisonné for photographs of the years 1925-1936. Only very few of these prints the artist explicitly did not refer to as “vintage”, and all as made on silver gelatin paper.

The 202 photographs were available to the artist as mostly single prints from an early, often lost, glass plate negative. From most of these early prints the artist either made or had made copy negatives (repro negatives), and documented this accordingly.

– In preparation for his second exhibition of photographs at the Prakapas Gallery, New York, in 1983, T. Lux Feininger put together a new collection of 97 vintage prints on silver gelatin paper. For this occasion, he compiled a list of works that documented his later photographic Oeuvre of the 1930s and 1940s [see note 214: Invoice, List of Photographs by T. Lux Feininger].
This list of 97 prints that were physically available in 1983 and which the artist measured and described, is the source for the Catalogue Raisonné for photographs of the years 1937-1950.


Other sources

Other sources for entries in the Catalogue Raisonné are numerous private and public collections, the Estate of T. Lux Feininger, as well as the relevant literature.

Often extensive collections of musems and galleries were accessible. In particular those of the Bauhaus Archive Berlin, the Bauhaus Foundations Dessau and Weimar, the Photographic Collection in the Folkwang Museum Essen, the Moritzburg Art Museum Foundation of the State of Saxony-Anhalt in Halle/S., the Harvard Museums in Cambridge/MA, the Getty Museum and Getty Research Institut and the LACMA in Los Angeles, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the Metropolitan Musuem (MET) in New York, the MFA Houston, the SFMOMA San Francisco, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam as well as the gallery collections of Berinson and Kicken in Berlin, and others.


ATTRIBUTIONS

The authorship of T. Lux Feininger can be established for all photographs collected in the Catalogue Raisonné. Doubtful attributions are marked in the title as [Authorship uncertain] and explained subsequently.


TITLES

The editors assigned work titles to each photograph. These titles refer to the respective situation of the motif, name the persons depicted and take into account notes and inscriptions of the artist as well as titles already published in the literature.

Only in a few cases the artist assigned titles to his photographs that go beyond the description of the subject matter, or the photographic technique. Photographs that he submitted to the German photographic agency “Dephot” received titles from the agency. These titles were changed as needed. Insofar as such specifications are of a binding nature, the title refers to them.

The titles chosen by curators and archivists of public collections for the photographs in their collections follow their respective requirements, often include references to the occasion and situation, and identify the people in the image. Authors and editors of publications often assign their own titles for the photographs in reference to their context. With the publication of the titles chosen here, later recognition is possible, which the editors of the Catalogue Raisonné have taken into account accordingly.

Furthermore, some group titles were created, if timing, occasion, subject or theme of the photographs suggested a compilation of such groups [see e.g. annotation 209, “Figure in Space“].


DATING

The dates of the creation of the photographs given by the artist himself, in literature, or in indexes of collections and archives, are often vague and only indicate time periods. As far as possible, the dates were verified and compared according to travel dates, event dates and other life events. Nevertheless, in numerous cases precise dating was not possible and requires further examination.

The determination of the time of a print made from the original negative (distinction between "vintage", "later/late print", "posthumous print") is not made in the Catalogue Raisonné.

____________________________

TERMS OF ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY

The Negative is the image carrier of the motif exposed in the camera. It is always unique. After a chemical development process, it is the template for the exposure on photographic paper which constitutes the print.

The Print represents the photography, the photo. A print consists of photographic paper exposed and developed in the darkroom, using the negative. Papers used can be silver gelatin paper as well as other kinds of photographic paper.

Early prints that were made by the artist himself shortly after he has taken the photograph, are referred to as “vintage prints” (vintages).
"Later prints" were exposed and developed by the artist sometime after the original negative was exposed.
"Late prints" were exposed even later, not necessarily by the artist himself.
“Posthumous prints” were made from the original negative by third parties after the artist's death.

A Copy print or Reproduction is a print from a negative made of an original print. It is a photograph of a photograph. The reproduction was not exposed from the original negative. Instead, it shows the image of an earlier print. A vintage, a later or late print, may have served as a template for the reproduction.



© Art-Archives.net, 17 February 2021

Exhibitions

The list of exhibitions of works by T. Lux Feininger has been newly compiled for the Catalogue Raisonné; solo exhibitions are listed as well as group exhibitions. All data is given as far as the information was accessible.

Listed are the title of the exhibition, date, place, and venue/organizer.

The records can be sorted in either ascending or descending order by clicking on the column header.

The works on display are linked to each exhibition. The Artworks can be invoked by a click on the number at the end of the line of each entry.

At the page of the respective work the exhibitions are mentioned on the bottom of the page, including catalogue- or exhibition-number. Switch from there to the exhibition list and see the complete bibliographical information of the exhibition.

In the chapter EXHIBITIONS - next to "Artworks" - also all "Literature" related to the very exhibition can be called up with a click (provided a publication exists).

Literature

The bibliography and publication list referring to T. Lux Feininger and/or his works has been newly compiled for the Catalogue Raisonné. The chapter LITERATURE lists all types of publications such as books, catalogues, newspapers, magazines, periodicals etc., based on accessible information at the time of compilation.

Each entry of the bibliography index mentions author/s and/or publisher, title, city and year of publication, as well as ISBN-number and type of publication.

The records can be sorted in either ascending or descending order by clicking on the column header.

The illustrated works of art are linked to each publication. The Artworks can be invoked by a click on the number at the end of the line of each entry.

At the page of the respective work the publications are mentioned under Literature on the bottom of the page, including information on pagination and/or illustration of the work. Switch from there to Literature and see the complete bibliographical information of the publication.

In the chapter LITERATURE – next to "Artworks" - also the "Exhibitions" related to the very publication can be called up with a click (provided there was exhibition).

Collections

The chapter COLLECTIONS lists the public collections that hold works by T. Lux Feininger, and who agreed to the publication.
Private collections are not mentioned in the online Catalogue Raisonné.

The works in their possession are linked to the very collection. The “Artworks” can be invoked by a click on the number at the end of the line of the entry.

The records can be sorted in either ascending or descending order by clicking on the column header.

Next to the name of each collection a button leads to the website of each collection.

At the page of the respective work/Paintings and Drawings the name of the public collection as its owner is mentioned below the data of the work. Institutional possessors of Photographs and Graphics are mentioned at each entry of their print.

Illustrations and Photo credits

Illustrations are based on the highest quality images available.

In some cases, this was not possible since the artwork was not accessible or the appropriate reproduction document was not available or the document at hand could not be matched to the original. In various cases old black and white photographs, color slides or amateur photos were used as illustration and although these were processed the quality remains largely insufficient. This is acceptable since it is important to present the body of work as complete as possible.

In few cases, no photo documentation about a particular work was available. Therefore, an illustration of the work was not possible, and the photo frame of the listing remains empty.

Copyright of all works by T.Lux Feininger: The Estate of T. Lux Feininger, USA.

See IMPRINT for further information.

The images shown are from various sources and by various photographers.
Photo credits are given under each image; usually in abbreviated form.

Photo credits - Abbreviations with their full text:

A22: Archiv T. Lux Feininger, Cambridge MA/USA
Albers Foundation (JAAF): The Anni and Josef Albers Foundation, Bethany CT, USA
AM: Achim Moeller/Moeller Fine Art, USA
art-archives: www.Art-Archives.net, www.Kunst-Archive.net, Duesseldorf, D
BA: Foto Bartsch Berlin, D
BW: Bradford Watkins, USA
Bz: Tom Brazelton, USA
CF: Conrad R. Feininger, USA
CM: Carnegie Art Museum, USA
DCF: Danilo Curti Feininger, I
DrMoellers: Dr. Doris Moellers Kunstkontor, D
FE: Freeman’s Philadelphia, USA
Galerie Berinson: Galerie Berinson, Berlin, D
GB: Gerd Bruhn, D
GE: Gallandi (via GB), D
GR: Grisebach GmbH Berlin, D
HA: Harvard Art Museums, USA
Hi: Ulrich Hiesinger, USA
HS: Horst Schomburg, D
JAAF: The Anni and Josef Albers Foundation, Bethany CT, USA
JL: Jan Lodal, USA
JN: John Nye, USA
Kendzia: Auktionshaus Kendzia, Hamburg, D
KL: Kevin Loader, USA
Koller AG: Koller Auctions AG, Zurich, Geneva, CH
Kr: Hermann Krause, D
Lempertz: Kunsthaus Lempertz KG, Cologne, D
LS: Linda Schroeder, USA
MA-Sc: Siegfried B Schäfer (extern), D
MAIN: Mainview based on an edited image of a print or negative.
MB: Museum Moritzburg Halle, D
MFA Houston: The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, USA
MN: Molly Nye, USA
MP: Martina Pipprich, D
Mo: Camilla Modéer, USA
NN: nomen nescio, Name unbekannt
RC: Renata E. Cathou, Lexington, USA
RE: Foto Rockmann Erfurt, D
RK: Foto-Renard Kiel, D
SC: Siegfried B Schäfer, D
SFMOMA: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, USA
SG: Stiftung Schleswig-Hosteinische Landesmuseen Schloss Gottorf, D
SKD-AdA: Archiv der Avantgarden, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Dresden, D
SKD Dresden: Kupferstich-Kabinett, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Dresden, D
Skinner: Skinner Inc. Auctions, Boston, USA
Sothebys: Photograph Courtesy of Sotheby's, Inc. (c)
SW: Waseem Sheikh, USA
We: Jakob Wedemeyer, D
WS: Verlag H. Krause Kunsthandel (Weltensegler), D

Abbreviations and Keys

Abb./ ill.: Abbildung / illustration
a.k.a.: also known as / auch genannt, auch bezeichnet als
Bez.: Bezeichnung, bezeichnet
BRM: Busch Reisinger [Germanic] Museum; today: Harvard Art Museums
ca.: circa / circa
cf.: compare / vergleiche
CoP: [201] Catalog of Paintings; Quelle /source: T. Lux Feininger
d.h.: das heißt / viz. / i.e. [id est] / that is to say
e.g.: for example / for instance / z.B. / zum Beispiel
Eng.: engine, locomotive / Lokomotive, Zugmaschine
err.: erroneously / irrtümlich
et al.: et alii, et aliae, et alia / among others, etc. / u.a., und andere, unter anderem
etc.: et cetera / and so on / und so weiter
ff.: folgend / following
foll.: following / folgend
HA: Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, Mass.
hic: hier / here
i. a.: inter alia / among other things / u.a. / unter anderem/n
i. e.: id est / that is to say / das heißt
IBP: [211] "Inventory of BAUHAUS-related photographs/ Inventar der Photographien aus der BAUHAUSzeit", 1980; Quelle /source: T. Lux Feininger
in: inches / Zoll
ill.: illustration / Abbildung
irrt.: irrtümlich / erroneously
Inscr.: Insciption, inscribed by the Artist
L: [202] List of sold works; Quelle/source: T. Lux Feininger
LoP: [214] List of Photographs, April 9, 1983. Photos assigned to the Prakapas Gallery New York [...] for an exhibition to be held approx. June 17, 1983 [by TLF]
l. t. r.: left to right / von links nach rechts
M./m.: Mast eines Schiffes [im Bildtitel] / mast of a ship (in work title)
mm: Millimeter / millimeter
n. y.: no year / ohne Jahr
o. J.: ohne Jahr / no year
o. T. : ohne Titel / no title
recto: vorn, Bildvorderseite / front side of the picture
R.R.: Rail Road (company) / Eisenbahn(gesellschaft)
S/p: Seite / page
Schr.: Schoner (im Bildtitel)
schr.: schooner [work title]
TD: [212] Three-Dim. Section/ Three-dimensional Works; Quelle /source: T. Lux Feininger
TLF: Theodore Lukas „Lux“ Feininger
u. a.: unter anderem, unter anderen / i. a. / inter alia /among other things
u. ä.: und ähnliche / and other similar (objects)
verso: Bildrückseite / the back side, reverse of a picture
vgl.: vergleiche / compare
viz.: i.e. [id est] / that is to say/ d.h. / das heißt
v. l. n. r.: von links nach rechts / from left to right
wg.: wegen / due to, because of
z.B.: zum Beispiel / e.g. / for example / for instance

* Asterisk (Star) marks a translation (title resp. text).
All titles – except the works destroyed by the artist – and comments were, when possible, translated in English resp. German. (When the artist used various and sometimes multilingual titles, the work shows multilingual titles that are not translated and therefore are not marked with an asterisk).

[…] French titles and word games are – in the sense of an explanation – translated into English or German and marked with square brackets.

[…] Remarks are shown in square brackets [101]. The number refers to the corresponding entry under Annotation and sources (see below).
Differing from this in the VITA of the artist references to sources of quotes are shown in round brackets (...), for optical reasons.

Annotations and References

An annotation number in the 200 range refers to a source
An annotation number in the 400 range refers to an exhibition

[…] Remarks are shown in square brackets [201]. The number refers to the corresponding entry under Annotation and sources (see below). Differing from this in the VITA of the artist references to sources of quotes are shown in round brackets (...), for optical reasons.

* Asterisk (Star) marks a translation

201 Catalog of Paintings, List of works by the artist

202 List of Sold Works, List of sold works by the artist

203 Notation by the artist on a photo or a document

204 Quote from a letter by the artist to collectors, museum etc.

205 Quote from the autobiography: T. Lux Feininger, „Zwei Welten“, 2. Auflage, Halle 2011, translation Florian Bergmeier. The englische Version quotes from the original manuscript „My Life and Paintings; A Memoir“ (typewriter, no page numbers)

206 Memo of conversations with T. Lux Feininger, various sources

207 Quote from editor correspondance with collectors, museums, galleries etc.

208 Ulrich Luckhardt, „Werkverzeichnis der Gemälde von 1929 bis 1936“, [catalogue raisonné paintings from 1929 up to 1936] in the catalogue for the jubilee exhibition „Welten-Segler – T. Lux Feininger, the centenary birthday”, Cologne 2010, p. 128ff.

209 Dirk Scheper, "Oskar Schlemmer - Das Triadische Ballett und die Bauhausbühne", Berlin 1988
[The titles chosen for photographies that T. Lux Feininger made from scenes of the bauhaus stage correspond to those given by Dirk Scheper (Oskar Schlemmer - Das Triadische Ballett und die Bauhausbühne, Berlin 1988) and Oskar Schlemmer in his essay in bauhaus3, 1927 (based on the speech, delivered March 16, 1927 [219]) respectively. By way of derogation all the titles of photographies of the many different scenes of the performance on March 16, 1927, 'Demonstrations of the Elements of Staging'* (Scheper, chapter 5.3. Demonstration der Bühnenelemente, S. 141 ff.) were given the generic term "Figur im Raum... / Figure in Space... This term - or collective title - stems from the statement Schlemmer gives in bauhaus3, 1927: "the art of staging is an art of space. ... part of the space is the form, the form of the planes, the plastic forms; integral part of the form is the color and the light ... all this [is] the base for the entire action on stage as it is embodied by man...! we will perceive the appearance of the human figure as a sensation and we will recognise that she is a 'being bewitched by space'. ... the environment that produced the procenium ... can be called the origin of all theatrical playing." - Nevertheless the choice of a short collective title avoids as well a term that cannot clearly be defined ('Bühenelemente/elements of staging') as a long detailed description.]

[Furthermore, the dating of the photographs was assigned to the year of the first time the very ‘dance’ had been publicly performed. However, in most of the cases the photographs picture posed scenes and were taken at the occasion of a separate photo-shooting, either before or after the premiere. – For 21 photographs of his dance-scenes T. Lux Feininger notes in his 'Inventory of Bauhaus-related Photographs' (211): “… were taken under Oskar Schlemmer's direction". – Of course, these photo shootings took place shortly prior or after the premiere, since costumes and props had to be ready first and photos for documentation and publicity would have been needed right after the show.]

210 Quote from reviews and articles from articles, newspapers, magazines, periodicals, catalogues, exhibition lists etc.

211 Inventory of BAUHAUS-related photographs/ Inventar der Photographien aus der BAUHAUSzeit, List of photographies by the artist [1980], executed by TLF in preparation for the exhibition in the Prakapas Gallery, with titles (Pos. 1-178 in German and English, Pos. 179-202 in English only), with measurements of the prints (incl. 'Appendix' and 'Supplement' this list is 17 pages strong and contains 202 positions) [Bhs].
Accompanying this list TLF prepares two further lists. The first handwritten list contains information about the copy negatives, marked as follows, mark A: 'copy neg. exists and is numbered'; mark B: copy neg. made by Mr. Boalin.
The second list is a copy of the 'Inventory of BAUHAUS-related photographs/ Inventar der Photographien aus der BAUHAUSzeit' with information about the copy negatives and works sold, named 'master copy' handwritten in green; mark C: 'signifies that a copy negative exists and in numbered in accoradance with this list'.; mark D: 'signifies print was returned Oct. 1983'; mark E: 'Blue dot signifies: sold Nov. 1980 to E. Prakapas, N.Y.'; mark F: 'Green dot signifies: Sold in the show [Ausstellung Prakapas Gallery 1980]'; mark G: 'Double dot [green] signifies: Sold on approval.'

212 Three-Dim. Section/ Three-dimensional Works, List of sculptures by the artist

213 T. Lux Feininger: Die Bauhauskapelle. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Bauhauses., April 1987, Cambridge, MA (Essay, unpoblished; Typoscript, 7 pages, copy with Bauhaus-Archiv, Berlin, Inv.nr.: 10018/1-7, ccan: Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin 2016, copyright: The Feininger Estate, Westport/MA

214 INVOICE List of Photographs by T. Lux Feininger, 22 March 1983 (Pos. 1.-50.) and INVOICE Supplementary List of Photographs by T. Lux Feininger, April 9, 1983 (Pos. 51.-97.) [LoP]. Photos assigned to the Prakapas Gallery New York [...] for an exhibition to be held approx. June 17, 1983; these lists are 4 pages strong and contain 97 positions. The photos are titled in English, the measurements in inches and are dated. The note: "(Note: only the numbers on the red labels are valid)", refers to the round red label on the reverse of the photos, marked with the handwritten position number.
Accompanying this list TLF prepares a further list. This is a copy of the 'INVOICE List of Photographs...' with handwritten notes in black referring to the returns, named 'Mastersheet' handwritten in red; mark: 'returned Oct. 1983'.

215 Transcript of notes: In 1990 The Paul Getty Museum, Santa Monica/Calif., asks T. Lux Feininger to identify the authorship of 49 photographies attributet to the artist in its collection (letter of April 16, 1990 by Weston Naef/ Judith Keller). The answering letter from April 28, 1990 includes an extensive four page "Transcript of notes on xerox copies". Here the artist classifies each photo in question as "by me" or "or not by me", sometimes "authorship uncertain" ["I ... am also making a type-written transcript of my scrawls for better legibility. Authorship of the images is indicated, beyond "yes" and "no", by positive other identification where it was possible, and a fourth category states that "authorship is uncertain" by which I mean that it is just possible that I may have taken the picture but had forgotten it."]. Furthermore TLF identifies the persons represented, the year of origin et al.

216 Typoscript of the letter of TLF in German language addressed to Christian Bouqueret, Paris, dated 26 July 1983. Bouqueret is autor of "bauhaus Photographie, Arles 1983. TLF answers to a letter of the author making corrections: "Wie gewünscht, erlaube ich mir einige kleine Anmerkungen zum Bildteil. [>] Das Bild auf Seite 7 ist [seiten]verkehrt gedruckt... Obgleich ich nur einen Meter vom Aufnahmeort entfert war, ist dieses Bild nicht von mir, wenn es auch dem meinigen sehr ähnelt. ... [>] Die Bilder auf Seite 11 und Nummern 3 und 11 sind auch nicht von mir. > Die Nummern 17, 18, 19 und 20 sind von einem Vorkursgenossen von 1926 namens Vollhardt in einem Lachkabinett aufgenommen... [>] Nummer 23 ist auch nicht von mir. > Die Nummern 58 und 59 dagegen sind von mir und wurden im Auftrag von Joost Schmidt und Franz Ehrlich aufgenommen. [>] ... Nummer 65 ist auch von mir und darf als eins meiner bekanntensten Fotos angesehen werden. Oskar Schlemmer, als ich ihm mit großem Stolz dieses Bild verehrte, war très ému. "Ha - N A ! Seh' ich s o aus?!" [>] N.B. Wenn auf einer Photographie der Stempel "Feiningerfoto" erscheint, handelt es sich immer um Andreas Feininger. [>] Ich danke ... für die beigelgten, kleinen Photokopien. Das Bild, in welchem Ernst Egeler (mit banjo, welches er nicht spielen konnte) einen wilden "Charleston" aufführt, ist zwar mit meiner Kamera, aber nicht von mir exponiert. Dies wäre auch schwierig gewesen, da ich auf der Mauer sitzend die Klarinette blasend (die ich aber zu spielen verstand) dargestellt bin. Die Dunkelkammer-Arbeit, ist von meiner Hand."

217 Smithsonian Archives of American Art, Washington D.C., Oral history Interview with T. Lux Feininger, 1987, May 19-1988 March 17, by Robert Brown. The oral history transcript is the result of a tape-recorded interview with Lux Feininger on May 19, 1987 to March 17, 1988. The interview took place in Cambridge, MA, and was conducted by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. www.aaa.si.edu/askus (2017).

218 Quote from the eight Albums which T. Lux Feininger produced in the early 2000s using drawings, photographies, collages and texts – each album contains a detailed list of contents (Vol. I - VIII).

219 Bauhaus jounal: bauhaus3, 1927, "bühne - aus einem vortrag von oskar schlemmer mit demonstrationen auf der bühne vor dem kreis der freunde des bauhauses am 16. märz 1927, S. 1-4. - cf.: bauhaus journal 1926-1931. facsimile edition, Lars Müller Publishers in collaboration with Bauhaus Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Zürich/Berlin 2019, ISBN 3037785888
[The titles chosen for photographies that T. Lux Feininger made from scenes of the bauhaus stage correspond to those given by Oskar Schlemmer in his essay (based on the speech, March 16, 1927) and Dirk Scheper (Oskar Schlemmer - Das Triadische Ballett und die Bauhausbühne, Berlin 1988, [209]) respectively. By way of derogation all the titles of photographies of the many different scenes of the performance on March 16, 1927, 'Demonstrations of the Elements of Staging'* (Scheper, chapter 5.3. Demonstration der Bühnenelemente, S. 141 ff.) were given the generic term "Figur im Raum... / Figure in Space... This term - or collective title - stems from the statement Schlemmer gives in bauhaus3, 1927: "the art of staging is an art of space. ... part of the space is the form, the form of the planes, the plastic forms; integral part of the form is the color and the light ... all this [is] the base for the entire action on stage as it is embodied by man...! we will perceive the appearance of the human figure as a sensation and we will recognise that she is a 'being bewitched by space'. ... the environment that produced the procenium ... can be called the origin of all theatrical playing." - Nevertheless the choice of a short collective title avoids as well a term that cannot clearly be defined ('Bühenelemente/elements of staging') as a long detailed description.]

220 Quotation mutatis mutandis from the manuscript by T.Lux Feininger, Cambridge, April 1978: "Aus meiner Frühzeit (From my early days)". Published in Ute Eskildsen, Jan-Christopher Horak (ed.): Film und Foto der zwanziger Jahre, Stuttgart 1979, ISBN 3775701419

221 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin: Jeannine Fiedler & T. Lux Feininger, the complete Interview, 1988, transcription at Bauhaus-Archiv, Berlin; quoted from: Staroste, Ulrike: "Der Sprung über das Bauhaus" - Das photographische Werk von T. Lux Feininger, Masterarbeit, TU Berlin, 2021.


401 Pittsburgh, Carnegie International Exhibition (1932-1942); Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute, "Painting in the United States" (1943-1948): In the notes of the artist he received an invitation to exhibit his works in the Carnegie International Exhibition in Pittsburgh in 1932, this was yearly repeated up to 1942 (see also the catalogue “Welten-Segler, Biography, compiled by Dr. U. Luckhardt, 2010, p. 124).

The Carnegie Museum of Art, Mrs. Jessica Ruse (eMail October 11, 2013), cannot confirm the participation in the exhibitons in he years 1932, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1947, 1948: “…I could not find any record of T. Lux entering work in the exhibitions for the other years you mention – not in the exhibition catalogues nor in the archives...”.

However there are photos for the years 1947 and 1948 in the artist archive depicting the exhibition rooms: showing in 1947 the painting „Excursion Steamer, 42nd Street, New York“ (ca. 1940) and in 1948 the painting „The Elysian Fields“ (1946).
In 1937 there is an exhibition photo with the painting „Clipper Schooner“ 1937, that was dated on the reverse by T. Lux Feininger, the indexcard from Carnegie Int. lists this painting in 1939, the editors marked this paiting in the exhibition list in 1937.

402 Solo exhibition in 1935, organised by Karl Nierendorf, shown in the Nierendorf Gallery, Berlin. Subsequently the exhibition works are given by Karl and Josef Nierendorf to the Commeter Gallery in Hamburg, they are shown there in 1935/36.


500 Editor's notes, internal marker

501 The attribution of the image needs verification. It was not specified by the artist but made by the editors.
The basis for the catalogue raisonné of the works of T. Lux Feininger are, i. a., his lists of works on the one hand, and photographs labeled by the artist with the work name on the other hand. Not all entries in these work lists could be assigned to images titled by the artist. And not all unlabeled images of his works could be assigned to work entries. In some cases, however, the artist's notes or measurements, among other things, provide clues that give reason to assume an attribution. Such attributions were made by the editors. And they are provided with this annotation because the assignment made, although probable, does not originate from the artist or is otherwise proven beyond doubt, and it ultimately requires confirmation or verification by further sources.

Catalogue Raisonné numbering

Catalogue Raisonné numbers have not yet been allocated.

The following organisation is intended:

Work groups are set apart in a tenthousand-code
10.iii - Painting
20.iii – Drawing – Original works on paper (drawings, watercolor, gouache…)
30.iii – Photografie
40.iii - Print
50.iii - Sculpture

The respective works in the work group obtain an ascending number corresponding to the date of origin in a chronological order.

The destroyed works will get an „x“ added to the numer. The destroyed works by the artist, such as are known to the editors, will be sorted in the appropriate work group in a chronological order.

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